Still from Expedition to the End of the World, 2013, directed by Daniel Dencik.
(Read the interview with Daniel Dencik and producer Michael Haslund)

Still from Expedition to the End of the World, 2013, directed by Daniel Dencik.

(Read the interview with Daniel Dencik and producer Michael Haslund)

  • Nan Goldin, Tabboo and Jimmy Paul in the bathroom, NYC, 1991.

    Nan Goldin, Tabboo and Jimmy Paul in the bathroom, NYC, 1991.

  • For example, I remember reading Hemingway and loving his work so much—but then at some point, realizing that my then-current life (or parts of it) would not be representable via his prose style. Living in Amarillo, Texas, working as a groundsman at an apartment complex, with strippers for pals around the complex, goofball drunks recently laid off from the nuclear plant accosting me at night when I played in our comical country band, a certain quality of West Texas lunatic-speak I was hearing, full of way off-base dreams and aspirations—I just couldn’t hear that American in Hem-speak. And that kind of moment is gold for a young writer: the door starts to open, just a crack.

    - George Saunders

  • Kathleen Hanna:

Beyoncé isn’t Beyoncé because she reads comments on the Internet. Beyoncé is in Ibiza, wearing a stomach necklace, walking hand in hand with her hot boyfriend. She’s going on the yacht and having a mimosa. She’s not reading shitty comments about herself on the Internet, and we shouldn’t either. I just think, Would Beyoncé be reading this? No, she would just delete it or somebody would delete it for her. What I really need to do is close the computer and then talk back to that voice and say, Fuck you. I don’t give a shit what you think. I’m Beyoncé. I’m going to Ibiza with Jay-Z now, fuck off. Being criticized is part of the job, but seeking it out isn’t. That’s our piece to let go.

    Kathleen Hanna:

    Beyoncé isn’t Beyoncé because she reads comments on the Internet. Beyoncé is in Ibiza, wearing a stomach necklace, walking hand in hand with her hot boyfriend. She’s going on the yacht and having a mimosa. She’s not reading shitty comments about herself on the Internet, and we shouldn’t either. I just think, Would Beyoncé be reading this? No, she would just delete it or somebody would delete it for her. What I really need to do is close the computer and then talk back to that voice and say, Fuck you. I don’t give a shit what you think. I’m Beyoncé. I’m going to Ibiza with Jay-Z now, fuck off. Being criticized is part of the job, but seeking it out isn’t. That’s our piece to let go.

  • Daniel McKewen, Running Men, 2008. Five-channel HD video installation, infinite loop. Installation documentation from “You Imagine What You Desire,” 19th Biennale of Sydney, 2014.
Read Daniel McKewen’s conversation with Madeleine Stack.

    Daniel McKewen, Running Men, 2008. Five-channel HD video installation, infinite loop. Installation documentation from “You Imagine What You Desire,” 19th Biennale of Sydney, 2014.

    Read Daniel McKewen’s conversation with Madeleine Stack.

  • You know that the most important means for you to create is your subconscious. Everything important comes from your subconscious. If you plan everything you’d be kidding your subconscious. So I don’t plan anything.

    - Haruki Murakami

  • Daniel McKewen, Zarathustra’s Cave, 2013-2014. Single-channel HD video installation with 5.1 channel sound, infinite loop. Installation documentation from NEW 14, ACCA, Sydney, 2014.
"I was very aware, though, that even if the viewer stays for thirty seconds, they’re going to see Seinfeld again at some point in their lives. That set is in every episode. So there’s going to be this kind of weird thing that occurs, where they might not realize it, but it shifts somewhat. What happens when they have that visual recognition the next time they see that set?”
(Read More)

    Daniel McKewen, Zarathustra’s Cave, 2013-2014. Single-channel HD video installation with 5.1 channel sound, infinite loop. Installation documentation from NEW 14, ACCA, Sydney, 2014.

    "I was very aware, though, that even if the viewer stays for thirty seconds, they’re going to see Seinfeld again at some point in their lives. That set is in every episode. So there’s going to be this kind of weird thing that occurs, where they might not realize it, but it shifts somewhat. What happens when they have that visual recognition the next time they see that set?”

    (Read More)

  • James Hoff’s Blaster arrives today:

    New York based conceptual artist James Hoff returns to PAN with ‘Blaster’, a document of his explorations of computer viruses as agents within the composition process. Specifically, Hoff used the Blaster virus to infect 808 beats and then utilized the mutated results as building blocks for seven new compositions.

    Hoff’s interest in computer viruses lies in their ability to self distribute through (and ultimately disrupt) networks of communication and Hoff’s agency as an artist centers on placing these parasitic forms into pre-existing genres, such as dance music. BLASTER is a timely exploration of the infectious qualities of sound, and how it too, as a carrier, makes it’s way through social networks, reduced to bits and programmed to infiltrate and replicate.

    “Viruses, like art, need a host. Preferably a popular one.”

    Interested in ways in which the virus works could mutate and spread socially, the first side of ‘Blaster’ contains these sonic presentations, and the second houses all of the artist’s infected samples and serves as a scratch record for DJ’s, an object of utility, and ultimately a provocation, mobilizing its new hosts as a point of potential transmission.

    Blaster is a logical progression from Hoff’s PAN debut LP “How Wheeling Feels when the Ground Walks Away”, which dealt with aural documents of riots and disruptions and the record is part of a larger body of work by the artist that also includes virus paintings.

  • "I started illustrating Finnegans Wake in 2009 because no one convinced me not to.”

    Stephen Crowe on illustrating James Joyce

  • Ai Weiwei

    Ai Weiwei

  • Biblioteca España, Medellín
(Read the BOMB interview with architect Giancarlo Mazzanti)

    Biblioteca España, Medellín

    (Read the BOMB interview with architect Giancarlo Mazzanti)

  • Raymond Pettibon, No Title (It was posting), 1990, pen and ink on paper, 14 × 11”.
"I read as I write, write as I read. If it used to take me five minutes to read the whole newspaper, now, my mind wanders, and then five minutes later I wonder, Gee, did I read that? I used to take notes, and I have notebooks full of drawings and notes that were partly quotations, and I’ve done a lot of marginalia, writing in books. I’m usually reading a number of books at a time, and whether I get through an individual one is probably unlikely. I’ve lost interest in narrative. (sigh) At least in the sense of seeing how a story comes out at the end. There’s a type of reading where you get lost in the narrative and you become part of the story and you’re compelled to finish. I don’t really have any interest in that. For me, reading has become more microscopic, more about dissecting the work. It may start on the level of the novel, then go down to theme or style, then to a paragraph, and finally a sentence. Or the sentence itself becomes about structure, or the words in it. Probably the most obvious example of that kind of reading is James Joyce. It becomes a kind of disease. Every text becomes related to another one, even in a different language, down to each individual word, which then becomes a clue into the etymology of the word, and then that etymological tree. A different context, a different language … you’re just making these associations from one thing to another. I used to start out with a simple drawing that would begin as an idea, and then my writing would make some associations with something else. And then, you know, a day later, or a year later, or whenever, the whole page would be covered with small, finely written text. And it would become a lot of things that were meant to be just in one drawing, expanded into this while still part of my notes. Voluminous notes. You do actually get lost in that morass of associations.”
(Read more)

    Raymond PettibonNo Title (It was posting), 1990, pen and ink on paper, 14 × 11”.

    "I read as I write, write as I read. If it used to take me five minutes to read the whole newspaper, now, my mind wanders, and then five minutes later I wonder, Gee, did I read that? I used to take notes, and I have notebooks full of drawings and notes that were partly quotations, and I’ve done a lot of marginalia, writing in books. I’m usually reading a number of books at a time, and whether I get through an individual one is probably unlikely. I’ve lost interest in narrative. (sigh) At least in the sense of seeing how a story comes out at the end. There’s a type of reading where you get lost in the narrative and you become part of the story and you’re compelled to finish. I don’t really have any interest in that. For me, reading has become more microscopic, more about dissecting the work. It may start on the level of the novel, then go down to theme or style, then to a paragraph, and finally a sentence. Or the sentence itself becomes about structure, or the words in it. Probably the most obvious example of that kind of reading is James Joyce. It becomes a kind of disease. Every text becomes related to another one, even in a different language, down to each individual word, which then becomes a clue into the etymology of the word, and then that etymological tree. A different context, a different language … you’re just making these associations from one thing to another. I used to start out with a simple drawing that would begin as an idea, and then my writing would make some associations with something else. And then, you know, a day later, or a year later, or whenever, the whole page would be covered with small, finely written text. And it would become a lot of things that were meant to be just in one drawing, expanded into this while still part of my notes. Voluminous notes. You do actually get lost in that morass of associations.”

    (Read more)

  • "Would (A Prologue)" by Justin Berry

    "Would (A Prologue)" by Justin Berry

  • "Play by Play" by Autre Ne Veut

    "Aesthetic pursuits aside, one of my great pleasures is observing human behavior and trying to understand what motivates people. My studies were a lesson in trying to operationalize something that otherwise is really much more fun. Music is one great outlet for me, but so too are Puck-like pranks. The latter tends to get under peoples’ skin more, so I’ve been turning my focus toward my more established creative pursuits."  —Arthur Ashin


    (Read more)

  • "I changed my reality, and that is not only for movies. It is an act of psychological healing. The world is so ill and we need to make art that can heal. We need to try to heal something, not go to movies to forget. You need to go to movies to find yourself."
—Alejandro Jodorowsky
Photograph by Balarama Heller

    "I changed my reality, and that is not only for movies. It is an act of psychological healing. The world is so ill and we need to make art that can heal. We need to try to heal something, not go to movies to forget. You need to go to movies to find yourself."

    Alejandro Jodorowsky

    Photograph by Balarama Heller