Mark your calendars: we’re planning a blowout night to celebrate our Fall Issue. Readings by Claudia Rankine and Frederic Tuten, plus a rare musical performance from James Hoff and Eli Keszler. Drinks courtesy of Sixpoint Brewery.
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Mark your calendars: we’re planning a blowout night to celebrate our Fall Issue. Readings by Claudia Rankine and Frederic Tuten, plus a rare musical performance from James Hoff and Eli Keszler. Drinks courtesy of Sixpoint Brewery.

(Facebook details)

  • Our Fall Issue is here! You can read the entire thing online, for free, right this minute. We’re very proud of this one. 

INTERVIEWS
ART — Moyra Davey by Elisabeth LeboviciPrior to Burn the Diaries, her exhibition at the ICA Philadelphia this fall, Davey exchanged thoughts with Paris-based writer Lebovici on autobiographical writing, the formal potential of aerograms, and scatalogical confessionalism.
ART — James Hoff by Eli KeszlerFor Hoff, distribution networks serve as creative agents. Musician Eli Keszler queries the artist and publisher of Primary Information on paintings based on viruses and syndromes, and also on his pop-leaning sound works.
LITERATURE — Claudia Rankine by Lauren BerlantRankine and Berlant parse the implications of having to maneuver everyday racism, as well as Rankine’s incisive choice of images for her new poetry book, Citizen: An American Lyric.
ART — Matthew Weinstein by Laurie SimmonsWeinstein elaborates on the sources behind his animated videos with Simmons, with whom he has previously collaborated. These range from telemarketing, Brecht, entertainment, and what Weinstein calls the “national pastime” of self-absorption.
LITERATURE — Ben Lerner and Ariana ReinesFor Lerner, Reines’s poems are “sites for irrational and transpersonal powers.” Reines, in turn, thinks of Lerner’s new novel, 10:04, as “Time Regained retold as The Odyssey in a best of all possible worlds.” Their banter touches on Whitman, poetic address, and “obliviating.”
LITERATURE — Valeria Luiselli by Jennifer KabatAt the core of Luiselli’s two books now available in English—Faces in the Crowd, a novel, and Sidewalks, an essay collection—is an interest in cities and their fragmented representations in literature, maps, and GPS devices.
MUSIC — Tyondai Braxton by Ben VidaThe two musicians discuss the use of hybridized generative systems, Stravinsky, hip-hop, and performing as switchboard operators in Braxton’s in-progress work HIVE.
ART — Nicole Cherubini by Sarah BramanCherubini describes her lush, material-based approach to clay and glaze as “baroque minimalism.” Braman visited Cherubini’s Brooklyn Navy Yard studio as she prepared for her fall exhibition at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. 
BOMB SPECIFIC
Kevin Killian and Ugo Rondinone

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS
Andra Ursuta by Veronika Vogler // Michele Araujo by Lisa Cohen // Brie Ruais by James Trainor // Ben Berlow by Lanny Jordan Jackson

"FIRST PROOF" LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
Jens Fänge // Frederic Tuten // Steve Dickison // Dylan LandisDan Michlin // S.D. Chrostowska // Klaus Kertess // Corina Copp

EDITOR’S CHOICE
Cookie Mueller, The Cahiers Series, Aby Ngana Diop, Disco, Fantasy Football Psychoanalysis, Carroll Dunham, Allen Ruppersberg, and CAConrad

    Our Fall Issue is here! You can read the entire thing online, for free, right this minute. We’re very proud of this one. 

    INTERVIEWS

    ART — Moyra Davey by Elisabeth Lebovici
    Prior to Burn the Diaries, her exhibition at the ICA Philadelphia this fall, Davey exchanged thoughts with Paris-based writer Lebovici on autobiographical writing, the formal potential of aerograms, and scatalogical confessionalism.

    ART — James Hoff by Eli Keszler
    For Hoff, distribution networks serve as creative agents. Musician Eli Keszler queries the artist and publisher of Primary Information on paintings based on viruses and syndromes, and also on his pop-leaning sound works.

    LITERATURE — Claudia Rankine by Lauren Berlant
    Rankine and Berlant parse the implications of having to maneuver everyday racism, as well as Rankine’s incisive choice of images for her new poetry book, Citizen: An American Lyric.

    ART — Matthew Weinstein by Laurie Simmons
    Weinstein elaborates on the sources behind his animated videos with Simmons, with whom he has previously collaborated. These range from telemarketing, Brecht, entertainment, and what Weinstein calls the “national pastime” of self-absorption.

    LITERATURE — Ben Lerner and Ariana Reines
    For Lerner, Reines’s poems are “sites for irrational and transpersonal powers.” Reines, in turn, thinks of Lerner’s new novel, 10:04, as “Time Regained retold as The Odyssey in a best of all possible worlds.” Their banter touches on Whitman, poetic address, and “obliviating.”

    LITERATURE — Valeria Luiselli by Jennifer Kabat
    At the core of Luiselli’s two books now available in English—Faces in the Crowd, a novel, and Sidewalks, an essay collection—is an interest in cities and their fragmented representations in literature, maps, and GPS devices.

    MUSIC — Tyondai Braxton by Ben Vida
    The two musicians discuss the use of hybridized generative systems, Stravinsky, hip-hop, and performing as switchboard operators in Braxton’s in-progress work HIVE.

    ART — Nicole Cherubini by Sarah Braman
    Cherubini describes her lush, material-based approach to clay and glaze as “baroque minimalism.” Braman visited Cherubini’s Brooklyn Navy Yard studio as she prepared for her fall exhibition at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. 

    BOMB SPECIFIC

    Kevin Killian and Ugo Rondinone

    ARTISTS ON ARTISTS

    Andra Ursuta by Veronika Vogler // Michele Araujo by Lisa Cohen // Brie Ruais by James Trainor // Ben Berlow by Lanny Jordan Jackson

    "FIRST PROOF" LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

    Jens Fänge // Frederic Tuten // Steve Dickison // Dylan Landis
    Dan Michlin // S.D. Chrostowska // Klaus Kertess // Corina Copp

    EDITOR’S CHOICE

    Cookie MuellerThe Cahiers SeriesAby Ngana DiopDiscoFantasy Football PsychoanalysisCarroll DunhamAllen Ruppersberg, and CAConrad

  • Daniel Bachman interviews Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler about their new record Slant of Light:

    Daniel Buchanan: Mary, did you have some ideas that you wanted to expand upon?
    Mary Lattimore: No ideas. (laughter) We’d just start off with a little nugget of a thought. I would start playing this thing and Jeff would be like, Okay, I’m going to learn this on the guitar and double it, or add a layer with the melodica. And that was the beginning. There were little kernels that came out of improvisation. We just sort of expanded those little kernels and then played them a second time to see what shape they could take. Three out of the four songs are second takes, and the other is the first take.
    DB: Yeah, that’s another thing I wanted to ask you about after listening to it through, which I did on the car ride back down here. Are there other instruments in the mix?
    ML: Oh yeah. The new instrument—the melodica!
    Jeff Zeigler: Just synth, melodica, and the giant vaporizer, basically. (laughter) Harp, synth, melodica, guitar, and that’s pretty much it.
    DB: Is there some kind of percussion on the last track?
    JZ: No, that’s my guitar through a ring modulator.
    DB: Whoa.
    JZ: Yeah, it’s real clangy sounding. It’s all guitar.
    DB: It’s nice.
    JZ: Thanks.
    DB: That last track is pretty far out.
    JZ: Yeah. It’s like a good bad trip.
    DB: (laughter) It’s like when you’re really having a bad experience and your stomach’s in your throat and then you kind of settle back in, but then it leads you along again, and you’re like, I’m not out of it yet.

  • "I always thought that all it took for the band to be taken more seriously was a little bit of cockiness with our imagery."
-Stephen Malkmus

    "I always thought that all it took for the band to be taken more seriously was a little bit of cockiness with our imagery."

    -Stephen Malkmus

  • Kathleen Hanna:

Beyoncé isn’t Beyoncé because she reads comments on the Internet. Beyoncé is in Ibiza, wearing a stomach necklace, walking hand in hand with her hot boyfriend. She’s going on the yacht and having a mimosa. She’s not reading shitty comments about herself on the Internet, and we shouldn’t either. I just think, Would Beyoncé be reading this? No, she would just delete it or somebody would delete it for her. What I really need to do is close the computer and then talk back to that voice and say, Fuck you. I don’t give a shit what you think. I’m Beyoncé. I’m going to Ibiza with Jay-Z now, fuck off. Being criticized is part of the job, but seeking it out isn’t. That’s our piece to let go.

    Kathleen Hanna:

    Beyoncé isn’t Beyoncé because she reads comments on the Internet. Beyoncé is in Ibiza, wearing a stomach necklace, walking hand in hand with her hot boyfriend. She’s going on the yacht and having a mimosa. She’s not reading shitty comments about herself on the Internet, and we shouldn’t either. I just think, Would Beyoncé be reading this? No, she would just delete it or somebody would delete it for her. What I really need to do is close the computer and then talk back to that voice and say, Fuck you. I don’t give a shit what you think. I’m Beyoncé. I’m going to Ibiza with Jay-Z now, fuck off. Being criticized is part of the job, but seeking it out isn’t. That’s our piece to let go.

  • James Hoff’s Blaster arrives today:

    New York based conceptual artist James Hoff returns to PAN with ‘Blaster’, a document of his explorations of computer viruses as agents within the composition process. Specifically, Hoff used the Blaster virus to infect 808 beats and then utilized the mutated results as building blocks for seven new compositions.

    Hoff’s interest in computer viruses lies in their ability to self distribute through (and ultimately disrupt) networks of communication and Hoff’s agency as an artist centers on placing these parasitic forms into pre-existing genres, such as dance music. BLASTER is a timely exploration of the infectious qualities of sound, and how it too, as a carrier, makes it’s way through social networks, reduced to bits and programmed to infiltrate and replicate.

    “Viruses, like art, need a host. Preferably a popular one.”

    Interested in ways in which the virus works could mutate and spread socially, the first side of ‘Blaster’ contains these sonic presentations, and the second houses all of the artist’s infected samples and serves as a scratch record for DJ’s, an object of utility, and ultimately a provocation, mobilizing its new hosts as a point of potential transmission.

    Blaster is a logical progression from Hoff’s PAN debut LP “How Wheeling Feels when the Ground Walks Away”, which dealt with aural documents of riots and disruptions and the record is part of a larger body of work by the artist that also includes virus paintings.

  • "Play by Play" by Autre Ne Veut

    "Aesthetic pursuits aside, one of my great pleasures is observing human behavior and trying to understand what motivates people. My studies were a lesson in trying to operationalize something that otherwise is really much more fun. Music is one great outlet for me, but so too are Puck-like pranks. The latter tends to get under peoples’ skin more, so I’ve been turning my focus toward my more established creative pursuits."  —Arthur Ashin


    (Read more)

  • BOMB Magazine — David Kilgour & Robert Scott of The Clean, by Clinton Krute

    David Kilgour: ”I keep coming back, in terms of books and writings, to the things that first inspired me. Like in terms of bands, the obvious ones like the Velvets and New York punk bands, and early youngish punk bands. For some reason those have made a strong lesion in my musical brain, I suppose. Just reading the Alex Chilton book at the moment, and that’s a really interesting read. We actually got to play with him in ’96 in Germany, so I sort of feel like I’ve got a good insight into him. He taught us how to smoke hash off the end of a guitar string under a glass.”

  • "I wanna go to fuckin’ church every fuckin’ day but I can’t go anymore. I just can’t." –Ariel Pink in conversation with Cass McCombs
To read entire article in new Issue 120, visit http://bombsite.com/issues/120/articles/6617

    "I wanna go to fuckin’ church every fuckin’ day but I can’t go anymore. I just can’t." –Ariel Pink in conversation with Cass McCombs

    To read entire article in new Issue 120, visit http://bombsite.com/issues/120/articles/6617

  • "Let’s jump into a volcano together!" –Cass McCombs interviewed by Ariel Pink 
To read entire article in the new Issue 120, visit http://bombsite.com/issues/120/articles/6617/edit

    "Let’s jump into a volcano together!" –Cass McCombs interviewed by Ariel Pink

    To read entire article in the new Issue 120, visit http://bombsite.com/issues/120/articles/6617/edit

  • 
‎I sit here and I feel like a shell harboring my brain and my brain is faxing different thoughts to other parts.
—Patti Smith, BOMB 54/Winter 1996

    ‎I sit here and I feel like a shell harboring my brain and my brain is faxing different thoughts to other parts.

    —Patti Smith, BOMB 54/Winter 1996

  • 
It is a familiar world, but because it has been made strange through opera, you look twice at what would otherwise be considered ordinary and realize that it contains mysteries that you’d never noticed before.
—Robert Ashley, BOMB 118/Fall 2011

    It is a familiar world, but because it has been made strange through opera, you look twice at what would otherwise be considered ordinary and realize that it contains mysteries that you’d never noticed before.

    —Robert Ashley, BOMB 118/Fall 2011

  • Malcolm McClaren: Your record uses rap to spread that idea.Prince B.: It doesn’t use rap at all. I’m just feeling my own thing and it comes out so close to rap because it’s talk, it’s conversation. But it’s the lyrics that separate us from the whole rap vibe.MM: So you don’t consider it rap at all?PB: No, I haven’t written a rap song in a while. When you do rap, you have to condition yourself to a certain frame of mind. Up-front, in-your-face, laying-it-on-the-line type of sound. Delivery is what I find interesting about rap. The wholeheartedness of it. The words, I don’t really listen to anymore because they’re sadistic.MM: The boasting thing.PB: Yeah, that’s how it started out. There were a lot of rappers who were black and trying to prove their manhood, but it’s beyond all that now. It only makes things worse. I think Public Enemy makes mountains out of molehills; N.W.A. don’t say anything at all. The only one I say tells the truth is Ice Cube. He tells it exactly like it is.
—BOMB 37/Fall 1991

    Malcolm McClaren: Your record uses rap to spread that idea.

    Prince B.: It doesn’t use rap at all. I’m just feeling my own thing and it comes out so close to rap because it’s talk, it’s conversation. But it’s the lyrics that separate us from the whole rap vibe.

    MM: So you don’t consider it rap at all?

    PB: No, I haven’t written a rap song in a while. When you do rap, you have to condition yourself to a certain frame of mind. Up-front, in-your-face, laying-it-on-the-line type of sound. Delivery is what I find interesting about rap. The wholeheartedness of it. The words, I don’t really listen to anymore because they’re sadistic.

    MM: The boasting thing.

    PB: Yeah, that’s how it started out. There were a lot of rappers who were black and trying to prove their manhood, but it’s beyond all that now. It only makes things worse. I think Public Enemy makes mountains out of molehills; N.W.A. don’t say anything at all. The only one I say tells the truth is Ice Cube. He tells it exactly like it is.

    BOMB 37/Fall 1991

  • 
Music is visceral. The written page is mental. You take in the vibrations—they go into your eye and into your brain. But with music, it fills the atmosphere, it penetrates your body.
—Sam Coones, BOMB 2012

    Music is visceral. The written page is mental. You take in the vibrations—they go into your eye and into your brain. But with music, it fills the atmosphere, it penetrates your body.

    —Sam Coones, BOMB 2012

  • This BOMB podcast was co-produced with 651 ARTS is a conversation between composers Tania León and Philip Glass. This event was recorded live at The James and Martha Duffy Performance Space at the Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn on February 8, 2011, as part of 651 ARTS’ LIVE & OUTSPOKEN series.