Malcolm McClaren: Your record uses rap to spread that idea.Prince B.: It doesn’t use rap at all. I’m just feeling my own thing and it comes out so close to rap because it’s talk, it’s conversation. But it’s the lyrics that separate us from the whole rap vibe.MM: So you don’t consider it rap at all?PB: No, I haven’t written a rap song in a while. When you do rap, you have to condition yourself to a certain frame of mind. Up-front, in-your-face, laying-it-on-the-line type of sound. Delivery is what I find interesting about rap. The wholeheartedness of it. The words, I don’t really listen to anymore because they’re sadistic.MM: The boasting thing.PB: Yeah, that’s how it started out. There were a lot of rappers who were black and trying to prove their manhood, but it’s beyond all that now. It only makes things worse. I think Public Enemy makes mountains out of molehills; N.W.A. don’t say anything at all. The only one I say tells the truth is Ice Cube. He tells it exactly like it is.
—BOMB 37/Fall 1991

Malcolm McClaren: Your record uses rap to spread that idea.

Prince B.: It doesn’t use rap at all. I’m just feeling my own thing and it comes out so close to rap because it’s talk, it’s conversation. But it’s the lyrics that separate us from the whole rap vibe.

MM: So you don’t consider it rap at all?

PB: No, I haven’t written a rap song in a while. When you do rap, you have to condition yourself to a certain frame of mind. Up-front, in-your-face, laying-it-on-the-line type of sound. Delivery is what I find interesting about rap. The wholeheartedness of it. The words, I don’t really listen to anymore because they’re sadistic.

MM: The boasting thing.

PB: Yeah, that’s how it started out. There were a lot of rappers who were black and trying to prove their manhood, but it’s beyond all that now. It only makes things worse. I think Public Enemy makes mountains out of molehills; N.W.A. don’t say anything at all. The only one I say tells the truth is Ice Cube. He tells it exactly like it is.

BOMB 37/Fall 1991


I saw Cat Power in the days of her nerves, when she did The Covers Record… She was absolutely wasted and banging her head on the piano, accidentally unplugging her guitar. She was sitting on the stage asking people to hold the mic stand for her. She would tell jokes and no one got it but us. I found it to be both terrifying and amazing; I hadn’t known that this was par for the course. I thought I was witnessing the biggest breakdown in history! Like, This is gonna go down in the books, the end of her career. I don’t think she finished one song all the way through. At the end it just degenerated into jokes and 30-second covers of Britney Spears. Then she laid her head on the piano for five minutes, got up, and left. It was ten times better than when I saw her recently with her blues-rock band. 
—Edward Droste, BOMB 112, 2010

I saw Cat Power in the days of her nerves, when she did The Covers Record… She was absolutely wasted and banging her head on the piano, accidentally unplugging her guitar. She was sitting on the stage asking people to hold the mic stand for her. She would tell jokes and no one got it but us. I found it to be both terrifying and amazing; I hadn’t known that this was par for the course. I thought I was witnessing the biggest breakdown in history! Like, This is gonna go down in the books, the end of her career. I don’t think she finished one song all the way through. At the end it just degenerated into jokes and 30-second covers of Britney Spears. Then she laid her head on the piano for five minutes, got up, and left. It was ten times better than when I saw her recently with her blues-rock band.

—Edward Droste, BOMB 112, 2010